B12

B12

Methylcobalamin 5000 mcg

60 Sublingual Tablets ( SKU: 9422, NPN: 80041191 )

Benefits

  • Lowers homocysteine levels for protective cardiovascular benefits
  • Methylcobalamin is the active form of vitamin B12 for maximum benefit
  • Superior to the more common form, cyanocobalamin, which does not convert to enough methylcobalamin to correct some forms of anemia, neurological defects, and aging
  • Sublingual tablets allow for fast acting delivery system directly into blood stream
  • Suitable for vegetarians

Feature Summary

Vitamin B12 is the cofactor in enzymatic reactions with diverse physiological functions. It is required for the conversion of methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA, as well as the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by methionine synthase, which is then converted into S-adenosylmethionine.1 A B12 deficiency causes impairments in both of these pathways, disrupting neurological function, including poor formation of myelin nerve sheaths, production of toxic levels of homocysteine, and inefficient energy production in all cells.2

Because of its relationship to myelin production and neurological function, high dose B12 has been used in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis.3,4,5

Some individuals, especially those with malabsorption or low dietary intake, are at higher risks for a B12 deficiency. Individuals with impaired absorption of B12 rely on passive absorption, which is typically 1% of the ingested amount. Thus high doses are required for those with greater B12 needs, such as elderly individuals and those with neurodegenerative disorders.6,7

Medicinal Ingredients

Serving Size: 1 Sublingual Tablet
Servings per Container: 60

Each Tablet Contains:
Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin)...................................5000 mcg

Non-Medicinal Ingredients

Lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium, vegetable grade magnesium stearate (lubricant).

Allergens:

Contains no artificial colours, preservatives, or sweeteners; no starch, sugar, wheat, gluten, yeast, soy, corn, egg, fish, shellfish, salt, tree nuts, or GMOs. Suitable for vegetarians. Sealed for your protection. Do not use if seal is broken. For freshness, store in a cool, dry place.

Contraindications

Consult a health care practitioner prior to use if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Keep out of reach of children

Drug Interactions

Although several classes of drugs, such as aminoglycosides, anticonvulsants, bile acid sequestrants, and proton pump inhibitors are known to either interfere with B12 absorption or function, there are no known negative interactions caused by B12 supplementation with any medications.8,9,10,11 B12 may enhance the function or reduce the adverse effects of several medication classes, such as SSRIs and oral contraceptives.12

  1. Guéant JL1, Caillerez-Fofou M, Battaglia-Hsu S, et al. Molecular and cellular effects of vitamin B12 in brain, myocardium and liver through its role as co-factor of methionine synthase. Biochimie. 2013 May;95(5):1033-40. doi: 10.1016/j.biochi.2013.01.020. Epub 2013 Feb 14.
  2. Miranda-Massari JR, Gonzalez MJ, Jimenez FJ, Allende-Vigo MZ, Duconge J. Metabolic correction in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: improving clinical results beyond symptom control. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Nov;6(4):260-73.
  3. Sun Y, Lai MS, Lu CJ. Effectiveness of vitamin B12 on diabetic neuropathy: systematic review of clinical controlled trials. Acta Neurol Taiwan. 2005 Jun;14(2):48-54.
  4. Kumar N. Neurologic aspects of cobalamin (B12) deficiency. Handb Clin Neurol. 2014;120:915-26. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-7020-4087-0.00060-7.
  5. McCaddon A. Vitamin B12 in neurology and ageing; clinical and genetic aspects. Biochimie. 2013 May;95(5):1066-76. doi: 10.1016/j.biochi.2012.11.017.
  6. Delpre G, Stark P, Niv Y. Sublingual therapy for cobalamin deficiency as an alternative to oral and parenteral cobalamin supplementation. Lancet. 1999 Aug 28;354(9180):740-1.
  7. Gröber U1, Kisters K, Schmidt J. Neuroenhancement with vitamin B12-underestimated neurological significance. Nutrients. 2013 Dec 12;5(12):5031-45. doi: 10.3390/nu5125031.
  8. McColl KE. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on vitamins and iron. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Mar;104 Suppl 2:S5-9.
  9. Aslan K, Bozdemir H, Unsal C, Güvenc B. The effect of antiepileptic drugs on vitamin B12 metabolism. Int J Lab Hematol. 2008 Feb;30(1):26-35.
  10. Markkanen T, Salmi HA, Sotaniemi E. Effect of neomycin treatment on the vitamin B12 content of human serum and urine. Z Vitam Horm Fermentforsch.1965;14(1):66-71.
  11. Karadag AS, Tutal E, Ertugrul DT, Akin KO. Effect of isotretinoin treatment on plasma holotranscobalamin, vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine levels: non-controlled study. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Dec;50(12):1564-9.
  12. Dierkes J, Westphal S, Kunstmann S, Banditt P, Lössner A, Luley C. Vitamin supplementation can markedly reduce the homocysteine elevation induced by fenofibrate. Atherosclerosis. 2001 Sep;158(1):161-4.