Mito AMP®

Mito AMP®

Supports Cellular Respiration*

60 Vegetarian Capsules ( SKU: 9241U )

Benefits

  • Helps support peripheral circulation and cardiovascular health*
  • CoQ10 has antioxidant activity and may help support mitochondrial function*1
  • R-alpha-lipoic acid may have better bioavailability than the racemic mixture2
  • In vivo studies have noted that the combination of acetyl-L-carnitine and R-alpha lipoic acid may help support mitochondrial health*3
  • Standardized Ginkgo biloba extract may help support cognitive function and memory in healthy adults*4
  • Resveratrol, the antioxidant found in Japanese Knotweed, may help support mitochondrial respiration in muscle*5
  • Grape seed proanthocyanidins may help support mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle*6
  • Suitable for vegetarians/vegans

Feature Summary

Healthy aging depends on healthy antioxidant activity.*7 While lifestyle interventions such as calorie restriction help support mitochondrial function in young non-obese adults, supplements such as L-carnitine may also support mitochondrial health.*8  The salt of L-carnitine, called acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), is the preferred form for healthy aging as it has better absorption and more easily crosses the blood-brain barrier.*9 ALC helps maintain blood pressure and blood glucose already within the normal ranges.*10,11,12,13 ALC and R-alpha lipoic acid together may offer greater support than either one alone.*14 Recently discovered agents such as pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) play a key role in supporting mitochondrial genesis via cell signaling (PGC-1 alpha).15 This latter ability to support mitochondrial production may in part explain the results of a recent open clinical trial. After taking 20 mg of PQQ daily for eight weeks, 20 healthy men and women (age 38 years on average) experienced support of energy maintenance, cognition, calm, and healthy mood.16 This formula, consisting of PQQ, ALC, CoQ10, ginkgo, resveratrol, and grape seed, helps support healthy cognitive function and memory as well as peripheral circulation and cardiovascular health in healthy adults.*

Supplement Facts:

Allergens:

Contains no artificial colors, preservatives, or sweeteners; no dairy, starch, sugar, wheat, gluten, yeast, soy, corn, egg, fish, shellfish, animal products, salt, tree nuts, or GMOs. Suitable for vegetarians/vegans.

Dosage:

Suggested Usage: 1 capsule 3 times per day or as directed by a health care professional. Consult a health care professional for use beyond 4 weeks.

Contraindications

Consult a health care professional prior to use if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you have been instructed to follow a low protein diet. Do not use if you are taking health products that affect blood coagulation (e.g., blood thinners, clotting factor replacements, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, fish oils, vitamin E) as this may increase the risk of spontaneous bleeding. May cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms (transient nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea). Feelings of sleeplessness and overstimulation may occur; discontinue use if such feelings persist or worsen.

Drug Interactions

Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) significantly influenced talinolol (beta 1 adrenoceptor blocker) maximum plasma concentration, likely a result of p-glycoprotein activity.17 GBE induces CYP3A metabolism and reduces midazolam and tolbutamide concentrations.18,19

  1. Littarru, G. P., & Tiano, L. (2005). Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care, 8(6), 641-6. 
  2. Keith, D. J., Butler, J. A., Bemer, B., et al. (2012). Pharmacol Res, 66(3), 199-206. 
  3. Long, J., Gao, F., Tong, L., et al. (2009). Neurochem Res, 34(4), 755-63. 
  4. Ihl, R., Tribanek, M., Bachinskaya, N., et al. (2012). Pharmacopsychiatry, 45(2), 41-6. 
  5. Timmers, S., Konings, E., Bilet, L., et al. (2011). Cell Metab, 14(5), 612–22. 
  6. Pajuelo, D., Fernández-Iglesias, A., Díaz, S., et al. (2011). J Agric Food Chem, 59(15),
    8491-8. 
  7. Ames, B. N., & Liu, J. (2004). Ann NY Acad Sci, 1033, 108-16. 
  8. Civitarese, A. E., Carling, S., Heilbronn, L. K., et al. (2007). PLoS Med, 4(3), e76. 
  9. Kido, Y., Tamai, I., Ohnari, A., et al. (2001). J Neurochem, 79(5), 959-69. 
  10. Ruggenenti, P., Cattaneo, D., Loriga, G., et al. (2009). Hypertension, 54(3), 567-74. 
  11. Malaguarnera, M., Gargante, M. P., Cristaldi, E., et al. (2008). Arch Gerontol Geriatr, 46(2),
    181-90. 
  12. Thal, L. J., Carta, A., Clarke, W. R., et al. (1996). Neurology, 47(3), 705-11. 
  13. De Grandis, D., & Minardi, C. (2002). Drugs R D, 3(4), 223-31. 
  14. Memeo, A., & Loiero, M. (2008). Clin Drug Investig, 28(8), 495-500. 
  15. Rucker, R., Chowanadisai, W., Nakano, M. (2009). Altern Med Rev, 14(3), 268-77. 
  16. Nakano M, Yamamoto T, Okimura, H., et al. (2012). Functional Foods in Health
    and Disease, 2,
    307-24. 
  17. Fan, L., Tao, G. Y., Wang, G., et al. (2009). Ann Pharmacother, 43(5), 944-9. 
  18. Robertson, S. M., Davey, R. T., Voell, J., et al. (2008). Curr Med Res Opin, 24(2), 591-9. 
  19. Uchida, S., Yamada, H., Li, X. D., et al. (2006). J Clin Pharmacol, 46(11), 1290-8.