B12

B12

Methylcobalamin 1000 mcg

60 Sublingual Tablets ( SKU: 9420, NPN: 80026765 )

Benefits

  • Lowers homocysteine levels for protective cardiovascular benefits
  • Superior to the more common form, cyanocobalamin as cyanocobalamin does not convert to enough methylcobalamin to correct some forms of anemia, neurological defects and aging7
  • Methylcobalamin is the active form of vitamin B12 for maximum benefit
  • Sublingual tablets allow for fast acting delivery system directly into blood stream

Feature Summary

Vitamin B12 is the cofactor in enzymatic reactions with diverse physiological functions. It is required for the conversion of methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA, as well as the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by methionine synthase, which is then converted into S-adenosylmethionine.1 A B12 deficiency causes impairments in both of these pathways, disrupting neurological function, including poor formation of myelin nerve sheaths, production of toxic levels of homocysteine, and inefficient energy production in all cells.2,3

Cobalamin is also required to remove the methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate and generate tetrahydrofolate, a necessary step in DNA synthesis. As a consequence, B12 deficiency affects the growth, function, and repair of all cells, the most apparent sign of which is megaloblastic anemia, caused by inhibited mitosis of red blood cells.4 Some individuals, especially those with malabsorption or low dietary intake, are at higher risks for a B12 deficiency. B12 in sublingual form, at a dose of 1000 mcg per day bypasses active absorption routes, and can restore normal B12 levels even in those with pernicious anemia and/or impaired absorptive capacity.5,6

Medicinal Ingredients

Serving Size: 1 Sublingual Tablet
Servings per Container: 60

Each Tablet Contains:
Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin)................................1000 mcg

Non-Medicinal Ingredients

Lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium, vegetable grade magnesium stearate (lubricant).

Allergens:

Contains no artificial preservatives, colour or sweeteners and no corn, soy, starch, wheat or yeast. Sealed for your protection. Do not use if seal is broken. For freshness, store in a cool, dry place.

Contraindications

Supplemental folic acid may mask a B12 deficiency, which should be ruled out, and folic acid and increased potassium intake is recommended with B12 therapy. B12 is considered safe in pregnant and lactating women, and may be indicated in children with a low dietary intake.

Drug Interactions

Although several classes of drugs, such as aminoglycosides, anticonvulsants, bile acid sequestrants, and proton pump inhibitors, antihyperglycemic medications (Metformin), acne therapy (isotretinoin) are known to either interfere with B12 absorption or function, there are no known negative interactions caused by B12 supplementation with any medications.8,9,10,11,12,13

  1. Hunt SM, Groff JL. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. New York: West Publishing Company, 1990:209-215.
  2. Miranda-Massari JR, Gonzalez MJ, Jimenez FJ, Allende-Vigo MZ, Duconge J. Metabolic correction in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: improving clinical results beyond symptom control. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Nov;6(4):260-73.
  3. Austin RC, Lentz SR, Werstuck GH. Role of hyperhomocysteinemia in endothelial dysfunction and atherothrombotic disease. Cell Death Differ. 2004 Jul;11 Suppl 1:S56-64.
  4. Parry TE. Megaloblastic anaemia in the elderly. Baillieres Clin Haematol. 1987 Jun;1(2):315-53.
  5. Kim HI, Hyung WJ, Song KJ, Choi SH, Kim CB, Noh SH. Oral vitamin B12 replacement: an effective treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Ann Surg Oncol. 2011 Dec;18(13):3711-7.
  6. Bolaman Z, Kadikoylu G, Yukselen V, Yavasoglu I, Barutca S, Senturk T. Oral versus intramuscular cobalamin treatment in megaloblastic anemia: a single-center, prospective, randomized, open-label study. Clin Ther. 2003 Dec;25(12):3124-34.
  7. [No authors listed]. Methylcobalamin. Altern Med Rev. 1998 Dec;3(6):461-3.
  8. McColl KE. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on vitamins and iron. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Mar;104 Suppl 2:S5-9.
  9. Aslan K, Bozdemir H, Unsal C, Güvenc B. The effect of antiepileptic drugs on vitamin B12 metabolism. Int J Lab Hematol. 2008 Feb;30(1):26-35.
  10. de Jager J, Kooy A, Lehert P, Wulffelé MG, van der Kolk J, Bets D, Verburg J, Donker AJ, Stehouwer CD. Long term treatment with metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes and risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency: randomised placebo controlled trial. BMJ. 2010 May 20;340:c2181. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c2181.
  11. Markkanen T, Salmi HA, Sotaniemi E. Effect of neomycin treatment on the vitamin B12 content of human serum and urine. Z Vitam Horm Fermentforsch. 1965;14(1):66-71.
  12. Karadag AS, Tutal E, Ertugrul DT, Akin KO. Effect of isotretinoin treatment on plasma holotranscobalamin, vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine levels: non-controlled study. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Dec;50(12):1564-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2011.05027.x.
  13. Dierkes J, Westphal S, Kunstmann S, Banditt P, Lössner A, Luley C. Vitamin supplementation can markedly reduce the homocysteine elevation induced by fenofibrate. Atherosclerosis.2001 Sep;158(1):161-4.